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in Prorom movies on TV / 19.01.2021

The Divergent Series: Insurgent - Friday on Antena 1

The blockbuster directed by Robert Schwentke, The Divergent Series: Insurgent is coming to Antena 1 on Friday, January 22.

Insurgent is the second part of the Divergent series, based on the bestselling novels written by Veronica Roth.

Revealed as Divergents - people who do not fit into one of the five categories ("factions") of society - Tris (Shailene Woodley) and Four (Theo James) are now fugitives, hunted by Jeanine (Kate Winslet) , the power-hungry leader of the Erudites faction.

Insurgent won two Awards at the 2015 Teen Choice Awards Gala (Choice Movie Actress: Action - Shailene Woodley and Choice Movie: Liplock - Shailene Woodley and Theo James).

The Divergent Series: Insurgent can be seen on Antena 1 on Friday, January 22, at 23:45 and on Saturday, January 23 at 04:00 a.m.




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in First Look / 07.12.2020

The first images from The Wolf and The Lion – coming to cinemas 2021

Mai Juin Productions, Galatée Films, Transfilm International, STUDIOCANAL and M6 Films launch three first look images from Gilles de Maistre’s The Wolf and The Lion.

From the same team behind Mia and The White Lion comes a new, furry, family adventure that will transport audiences into the heart of breath-taking Canadian landscapes.

The film is set to be released in the first half of 2021.

After her grandfather's death, 20-year-old Alma decides to go back to her childhood home – a little island in the heart of the majestic Canadian forest. Whilst there, she rescues two helpless cubs: a wolf and a lion.

They forge an inseparable bond, but their world soon collapses as the forest ranger discovers the animals and takes them away.

The two cub brothers must now embark on a treacherous journey across Canada to be reunited with one another and Alma once more.

The Wolf and The Lion is directed by Gilles de Maistre (Mia And The White Lion) and will star newcomer Molly Kunz (Widows) and Academy Award® nominee Graham Greene (Wind River, Dances With Wolves) alongside animal castmates, supervised by renowned animal trainer Andrew Simpson (Game Of Thrones, The Revenant).

Catherine Camborde of Mai Juin Productions, and Jacques Perrin, Nicolas Elghozi and Valentine Perrin of Galatée films are producing, alongside Canadian co-producer Claude Léger of Transfilm International.

The images can be viewed here (click).

All images: © 2020 Mai Juin Productions - Galatée Films - Wematin Productions - Studiocanal - M6 Films / Photo Emmanuel Guionet.




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in Prorom movies on TV / 13.11.2020

Colombiana: Revenge is Beautiful

Zoe Saldana is a sexy assassin in Colombiana, a revenge thriller from producer Luc Besson’s international action movie factory, which will be broadcast by Pro TV Monday, November 16th.

Zoe Saldana has been the cornerstone of Hollywood blockbusters for the better part of two decades. She was in all three of the J.J. Abrams-produced Star Trek movies as Uhura, was Neytiri in Avatar, and played Gamora in the Marvel’s Guardians of the Galaxy.

In the action film Colombiana, Zoe Saldana plays Cataleya, a young woman who has grown up to be an assassin after witnessing the murder of her parents as a child. Turning herself into a professional killer and working for her uncle, she remains focused on her ultimate goal: to hunt down and get revenge on the mobster responsible for her parents’ deaths.

Directed by Olivier Megaton (Taken 2, Taken 3), produced by EuropaCorp (Taken 1, 2, and 3) and co-written by Robert Mark Kamen (all three Taken movies), Colombiana proves us that Revenge is Beautiful.

Colombiana can be seen on PRO TV - Monday, November 16, at 21:30 and rerun on Wednesday, November 18, at 01:15.




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in Interviews / 07.02.2020

Exclusive interview with Iulian Grigoriu: “Latte is a feel good movie, about friendship in the first place”

This weekend, Latte and the Magic Waterstone (directed by Mimi Maynard, Regina Welker) arrives in cinemas in Romania. On this occasion, we bring you an exclusive interview with Iulian Grigoriu, the Romanian who was animation director for this film.

How did you get to do what you do now? Working in this area of animation?
I always wanted to make cartoons. When I was a kid, on Saturdays, at the end of school, I was running home to see final minutes from the Gala Desenului Animat  (Cartoon Gala – a famous Romanian show in th '90s). Then they took me to the Doina cinema. (in the past a famous Romanian cinema where they running only family films and animations). It was like I arrived in the cartoon country.

They had wallpapers of animals from the jungle on the walls, it was a small room and somehow intimate, weekly program where you could find full-length movies that you would see on TV only in the parts of a few minutes a week. What can I say? It was fantastic!

I've been drawing since I was little, and even tried to be a serious artist and to focus on things with more weight, respectable but I failed. When I entered the high school of arts and saw that they had the animation section I had no doubt. I didn't have to choose between sections. Things were no longer the same at the academy where there was no animation section.

Animation was not an art there, so I choose graphics and painting which was very useful to me later. But not to dramatize. I had a nice chance to work at Animafilm since I was in high school. That was practically the time when I was really inoculated with the animation virus and I say this because during my student years I tried to do other jobs but I always went back to animation.

A friend of mine, Olimp Bandalac told me: "Once you have got the animation virus you will not escape". And so it is for most of us.

Then I worked through almost all the studios in Bucharest in the '90s. But as I was young, inexperienced, those years were pretty gray. In the late 90's, after finishing college, I went to Hungary and that was it. After a year my girlfriend from then came with me. She became my wife after a few years.

What does the job of animation director and supervisor mean?
This position is a very responsible one and quite difficult from several points of view. Job descriptions can be found on the net but I tell you what it means to me and how I relate to this position. First of all you have to be an animator yourself. Only this way you can help where it is needed.

Every time I start a new movie I try to document myself as much as possible. What is the original story behind the script. Who are my directors, possibly the producers. After that I try to understand as best I can the script and the characters in the film. The deeper I get into the story, the better I realize the subtleties and layers of the film.

From here I start to have discussions with the director (the directors in this case of Latte) and to deepen the story and the characters. What kind of acting we need, as well as in what sense to exaggerate etc. Once it is clear to me what the directors want, I start working on the animation style, find a rhythm of the film, look for references by actors to help the animator understand the character.

Many times I even make a database representing what kind of expressions should be used and the limits of deformations. I can usually select the team after tests or portfolios. Once the team or teams are chosen, I usually do an acting workshop on the characters in the movie. I'm trying to make the animators understand why character X is moving like this and why it has to be different from other characters.

How a character evolves during the film and how important it is to animate as much as needed and where needed. Only then do I begin to talk about each sequence and each scene. If the animation is not correct I send additional drawings to the frame where something needs to be changed. As a simple supervisor the work is a little simpler, having to follow the instructions of the animation director.

How long have you been working as animation director and supervisor?
I think I started in 2009 or 2010 with a famous series in Germany. A production for preschoolers called Kikaninchen, a position assumed by Anca starting with season 2, becoming "kikaninchen's mother" over a few years.That's how they called it in Mitteldeutsche Zeitung in an article about the series. In the meantime, I started working on the first feature film as animation director in Belgium.

There I had the “baptism of fire”. We were working on a big film, produced in Paris and we had to send weekly a fixed number of seconds to a quality that we had not worked before. I learned a lot and realized that I still have a lot of work to do. It was a good school.

I know that before you settled in Germany you had a period when you also worked in Hungary? How was that experience?
In Hungary were the years of my growing up professionally or at least the beginning of them. We went through some experiences and we had the chance to qualify professionally, being forced to keep the deadlines, doing a large volume of animation and doing many tests. It was a good school.

You have worked on many successful animated films. What project do you keep closely to your heart and why?
I can't say I liked one movie... it's like asking a parent which of the children is dearer to him. I mean a good parent :-) Each production is different, and has its problems and solutions. Teams often differ completely. For example, now we are working on a new film by Enzo Dálo. For me 90-95% of the team is new. We will have first and foremost many young animators who will need a lot of advice. It will be fun and very interesting of course but it will be also a new adventure from which I will learn a lot.

Who has influenced you the most in your career?
Work in the studio. I learned a lot by watching a lot of movies and here I mention that not only animation and not only American. I read a lot and try to document myself a lot. BUT! I happen to work with people who are really big names in the field and and I can learn a lot from them.

I learned from Tahsin Özgür who animated for Disney in a few big movies. Another name that inspired me through the vitality of work and professionalism is Jesper Moller and in the last year and something I have worked and still work with Daniel St. Pierre from which I learned many details that you can not find in books. Of course, I learned something from each film I worked on and there are several names that influenced my evolution whether or not I was aware of it.

How much does working on a European animation differ from one for a larger studio? The difference is only about money, or also involves more special technology?
This is a good question :-) First and foremost, in Europe, there are increasingly competitive productions, by American standards. The only problem is the budget of the film. The bigger the budget, the more time you have to work on story, design, style, animation, effects, light... etc. The last film I worked on and we hope to release this year is an India-China co-production and is at a high standard. Here I worked hard on the quality of the animation and it will feel.

In 2019 you worked on the animation Latte & the Magic Waterstone as animation director. Can you tell me how you got to work on this project?
I first saw the trailer on the net. It was kind of love at first sight. I knew I could do a lot with a character like Latte. About 7-8 months, when I was approaching the final production of that time (Marnie’s World or Spy Cat) I announced online that I will be free of contract.

Then I received an email from a Belgian colleague from the production company if it is ok to recommend me to the German producer of Latte Igel. Do you realize that I was flying on a cloud and seeing the city from above :-) I said yes, I was contacted and that was it.

How did you work with directors Regina Welker and Nina Wels?
The collaboration with these two beautiful ladies was extraordinary. And I'm not exaggerating. I anchored Latte's acting based on the personality or the way Regina moves. The funny thing is that she says she moves the same way I do but you should see her. He is an animated character full of energy and humor.

After we had our first Skype talk, I was a little scared that we didn't quite understand about the message of the movie. That was my impression and I don't think it was that way, but I'm an emotional guy, so I belived that.

It was only when we met face-to-face in the studio I realized how they are and what they want… we started to know each other and actually worked on the construction of the film. We made many ideas exchanges and sometimes we argued about things, but in a constructive way, and all of that practically served to raise the quality of the film.

Nina helped me a lot with the team from Ludwigsburg and Halle / Saale, I also had to work in India. We had a total of 4 teams and fortunately all were talented and motivated.

Prorom will release on February 7 in Romanian cinemas Latte & the Magic Waterstone. Do you have a special message for the spectators who are going to see it?
Latte
is a feel good movie, about friendship in the first place. You may be surprised that the story will catch you and you won't know when the time has passed. I just hope you like it as much as we liked to create it and bring it to the cinema. I look forward to the reaction of the Romanian audience.

Interview by Emanuel Lăzărescu.




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in Events / 27.01.2020

Gala Premiere for Song of Names in Hungary

The Song of Names, the new movie by director François Girard starring Tim Roth and Clive Owen had a Gala Premiere in Hungary on 21st of January, in Urania Cinema.

Over 250 Guest were present at this event, hosted by the famous Dorka Gyarfas. Among the guests there was the producer Robert Lantos who welcomed the guests with a few words about the movie and its creation.

Several famous Hungarian movie industry related people were present at this event, for example Kristóf Deák who is an Oscar-winner director or Csaba Káel - the Hungarian film director, CEO of Müpa Budapest and CEO of the National Film Institute Hungary.

One of the actors / musicians from the movie - Zoltán Schwarz (violin) took the stage and performed a song from the movie.

After the screening there were some interviews and an afterparty for the crew and the celebrities present at this event.

The Song of Names (titled in Hungary A nevek dala) will have its premiere in Hungary on 6th of February, distributed by Big Bang Media – A Prorom Company.

Foto (left to right): Tibor Krsko (Businessman), Robert Lantos (Producer of the movie) and Csaba Káel (CEO of the National Film Institute Hungary).




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in Hollywood / 19.06.2019

Two new posters for The Hummingbird Project

Two new posters for The Hummingbird Project surface, announcing the release of the movie in Australia.

Jesse Eisenberg and an almost unrecognizable Alexander Skarsgård play cousins Vincent and Anton Zalesky in acclaimed director Kim Nguyen's The Hummingbird Project.

Cousins from New York, Vincent (Jesse Eisenberg) and Anton (Alexander Skarsgård) are players in the high-stakes game of High-Frequency Trading, where winning is measured in milliseconds. Their dream? To build a straight fiber-optic cable line between Kansas and New Jersey, making them millions. But nothing is straightforward for this flawed pair.

Constantly breathing down their necks is their former boss Eva Torres (Salma Hayek), a powerful, intoxicating and manipulative trader who will stop at nothing to come between them and beat them at their own game.

Directed by Kim Nguyen, The Hummingbird Project stars Jesse Eisenberg, Alexander Skarsgård and Salma Hayek.

The Hummingbird Project had its world premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival on September 8, 2018, and was the opening gala at the Vancouver International Film Festival later that month.

Recently The Hummingbird Project won at Canadian Screen Awards the Award for Achievement in Overall Sound (Pierre Mertens, Thomas Gauder, Alexis Oscari).

Prorom released The Hummingbird Project in Hungary on April 4.





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